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could easily be labeled as of the hardest working guys in rock ’n roll. Guitarist, singer, songwriter, producer and filmmaker are among the points in his resume, and he seems to have an unlimited supply of that coveted creative vibe. His latest project is Nick Perri & The Underground Thieves, and their debut is titled Sun Via.

kicks off with Feeling Good, which is an irresistible blend of and compete with classic Hammond B-3 organ fills and an extended solo. (The to this song is a mind-blowing -take shot that must be seen to be fully appreciated).

Perri is heavily influenced by the music of the 60’s and 70’s in both sound and personal style. Three of the songs on the would fit quite nicely in an anthology of British songs of the mid-to-late 1960’s. I Want You, Excess and White Noise all have bright vocal harmonies that are very reminiscent of classic bands such as and The Byrds. White Noise features a saxophone solo which is the fruition of a dream for Perri, as in conversation he has mentioned including a sax solo in a song is something he’s always to explore. 

Fall is a very ethereal and dreamy song with reverb- guitars and deep vocal harmonies. 

Daughters & Sons is a song that spotlights Perri’s skills as a master songwriter and lyricist. Who wouldn’t be moved while listening to this song and hearing the line “Why do the evil get it all while the good ones die young, leaving daughters and sons.” On the opposite end of the musical spectrum is a tune with the curious, technical title of 5.0.1, a pure instrumental track jam packed with good ol’ -hero fireworks.

Perri is a musician’s musician, and on his Facebook page he’s posted a series of “deconstructing” videos in which he breaks what went into recording some of the songs on Sun Via. For anyone who is interested in recording and mixing, it’s like a free master class. 

The has debuted at #6 on the iTunes US chart, which is pretty impressive for an artist.  

https://www.facebook.com/nickperrimusic

https://www.nickperrimusic.com

 

 

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